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DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PET UNATTENDED IN A PARKED CAR DURING THE WARMER MONTHS!!

Updated: Jul 26


As temperatures soar, a common issue that all caring pet owners should be aware of is heatstroke (also known as heat stress). With the heat of the summer months, the number of cats and dogs visiting the vet due to this condition rises. Unfortunately many pet owners do not even realise that their cats and dogs can overheat when the weather is hot, and may only seek treatment at the eleventh hour.

While heat stress is more common in warmer months, it can occur at any time throughout the year even when the weather is mild.

Cats and dogs cannot respond to heat in the same way that us humans do. We have sweat glands all over our bodies that help us regulate our temperature, but dogs and cats only have a few in their feet and around their noses. Many animals rely on panting and external cooling to loose heat. Their long thick hair & coats can also predispose them to heat stroke.

This is why DOGS or any pets should never be left alone in parked cars even if you are only a few moments popping into a shop and the ac was on before you left the dog unattended.


DEFINITION


Hyperthermia (fever) is an elevation in body temperature above normal 

Heat Stroke (heat exhaustion) is a form of hyperthermia that occurs when heat-dissipating mechanisms of the body cannot accommodate excessive heat. Body temperatures above 105F are suggestive of heat stroke.



QUESTION: AT WHAT TEMPERATURE DO YOU COOK A PIZZA IN YOUR OVEN?






CONTRIBUTING FACTORS:


Heat stroke can be seen in all breeds of all ages, but may be more likely in long haired and brachycephalic (short nosed) breeds as well as younger and older individuals.

Elevated environmental temperature and humidity

Confinement in a car or other area without adequate ventilation

Exercise

Restricted access to water

Obesity


SIGNS:


Signs of heat stroke are very similar to the signs seen in humans, although dogs pant more in an effort to cool themselves.

Panting

Hypersalivation (drooling)

Warm to touch

Red mucous membranes of mouth

Rapid heart rate

Dry nose

Quiet or poorly responsive, may lay down and refuse or be unable to rise

Vomiting

Blood from mouth or in stool

Seizures

Muscle tremors

Ataxia (staggering)

Coma

Death


PREVENTION:


Have a cool, 

well-ventilated space for your pet.

 Good ventilation is critical because many animals lose heat by panting (evaporative cooling) which relies on good air flow. Outdoor pets should also always have access to shade.

All pets should have access to plenty of fresh clean drinking water at all times.

Never leave your pet in a car as temperatures rise extremely quickly even on mild temperature days and can kill pets rapidly.

Avoid exercising animals in hot weather.

Avoid hot sand, concrete, asphalt areas or any other areas where heat is reflected and there is no access to shade.

As temperatures soar, a common issue that all caring pet owners should be aware of is heatstroke (also known as heat stress). With the heat of the summer months, the number of cats and dogs visiting the vet due to this condition rises. Unfortunately many pet owners do not even realise that their cats and dogs can overheat when the weather is hot, and may only seek treatment at the eleventh hour.

While heat stress is more common in warmer months, it can occur at any time throughout the year even when the weather is mild.



IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO ABLE TO OFFER THE ABOVE TAKE YOUR DOG DIRECT TO YOUR VET, CALLING AHEAD WITH A DESCRIPTION OF HIS SYMPTOMS.

Sustainable City Branch

Whatsapp: +971 50 664 2863 Tel: +971 327 4921

Sports City Branch

Tel: +971 4 557 3199

Whatsapp: +971 56 397 0851


IF YOU SEE AN ANIMAL IN A LOCKED CAR SHOWING SIGNS OF HEAT STRESS

  1. Call the local Police department - 901 for assistance or 999 for emergency situations.

  2. Get the cars registration plate and go into the nearest shop and ask them to make an announcement, that a pet has been left in a hot car and showing signs of distress.

  3. Go back and wait for the police at the vehicle.


By Star Veterinary Clinics Veterinary Surgeon - Dr Bedoor Omran


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